Book Review: Meddling Kids by Edgar Cantero

meddling_kidsI was pleasantly surprised when I was contacted by Michael Goldsmith of DoubleDay Books requesting a book review of a new Lovecraftian fiction book by author, Edgar Cantero. Oh, I’ve written a few comic book reviews in the past and a book review for International Justice Mission, but that was the extent of my reviewing creds, and, as I said, it was several years ago.  In the end I decided that, hey, why not? I love to read, and I count Lovecraft as one of my biggest writing influences. So much so that I co-wrote the young Howard Lovecraft Trilogy with my good buddy, Bruce Brown, and I have an original Lovecraftian mini-series in the works with brilliant artist, Dave Youkovich.  Not to mention a few Lovecraftian short stories, an adaptation of Lovecraft’s HE for SelfMadeHero, and several unsuccessful pitches I’ve written over the years.

So it was decided.

In the years since Howard Phillips Lovecraft’s life, Lovecraftian fiction has become a popular horror subgenre which stresses cosmic, unknowable terrors and mankind’s hopelessness and helplessness to combat–or even fully comprehend–them. At the core, it is the fear of the unknown that drives the stories in this subgenre, and that is something we can all relate to, whether we are fans of science-fiction, or horror, or neither. It is from this commonality that brilliant screenwriter, Rod Serling (also a big influence on my work), penned some of his most poignant and terrifying episodes of The Twilight Zone. And Serling is only one in a long line of authors who have played upon this instantly relatable theme.

But I digress.

Imagine, if you will, the Scooby-Doo Gang in a Lovecraftian universe. As young people, the gang solved mysteries and unmasked bad guys–they were the heroes–but, during the course of their final caper they inadvertently brushed paths with unspeakable cosmic horror. It is an oppressive evil that haunts their dreams, poisons their lives, and they ultimately became scared, irreparably (?) damaged adults. Ultimately, these fractured adults decide to team up one last time and face the horror head on. This is Meddling Kids.

Does this sound similar to the synopsis of Stephen King‘s It to you? Indeed. Cantero isn’t breaking any new ground here, but what he does is tell an entertaining story that will have you furiously turning pages until you reach the bitter end. And he does so with great panache and skill. Cantero is obviously a master wordsmith who tips his hand every now and then, but never comes off as an exhibitionist. Snappy dialogue, vivid descriptions, quirky characters, and the building sense of dread will keep you enthralled and leave you wanting more. And for fans of Lovecraft’s work, you will find just enough that is familiar, but not so much that it feels overstated or cliché. As I said, this Cantero fellow knows what he is doing.

If this sounds like a fun story to you, you may be a Lovecraft fan. Or, maybe not. I believe that any reader who is merely looking for an entertaining, creepy summer read will find it quite enjoyable as well. Who knows…it may even compel some readers to check out H.P. Lovecraft’s work, and that would be awesome, indeed.

-Dwight

 

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Elevator #1 is ALIVE!

Elevator Promo Graphic KEY Comixology Kindle

I’m excited to announce that  Elevator #1 is NOW available on Kindle (http://ow.ly/iGPS30bp8zu ) &  ComiXology (http://ow.ly/bSS930bp2Sh )! Download your copy today, read, rate, and let your family and friends know about it! Classic horror for $1.99? You can’t beat that!

-Dwight

The Imaginary Voyages of Edgar Allan Poe #1 Early Review!

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Our first review for The Imaginary Voyages of Edgar Allan Poe #1 is back and it is OUTSTANDING! Take a bow, Luis Czerniawski, Andrea Messi, and Marco Della Verde! And special thanks to Ryan McLelland for the A+ rating! I appreciate you very much, my friend!

READ THE FULL REVIEW HERE!

-D

Elevator #1 Release Date and Solicit

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Coming to ComiXology March 16th…

Elevator #1
Written by Dwight L. MacPherson
Illustrated by Randy Valiente
Lettered by Marco Della Verde
Edited by Amy H. Sturgis

Elevator Canto I: Descent

Edward and Richard Bane return to their childhood home with friends Sam and Matt. They believe the visit will be therapeutic until they are met by Phillippe Iblis, a mysterious caretaker with diabolical intentions.

-D

For Your Halloween Season Viewing Pleasure, Part I

‘Tis the season for all things spooky!

So… I was going through my art files and I came across this comic short that I wrote for IDW Publishing’s Gene Simmons’ House of Horrors. The story features art and colors by German Torres and letters by Robbie Robbins. I think it’s pretty good, and I hope you will, too.

By the way, these pages belong to IDW Publishing. You do not have permission to steal–er–use them for your own wicked purposes.

Enjoy!

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-Dwight

 

 

 

Inktober… Day 6

mr-nibbles

Once you have seen Mr. Nibbles, you can never unsee him.

As a consolation, here’s a (less) horrible poem for National Poetry Day:

Samonios’ Kiss

©2016 Dwight L. MacPherson

Bloody leaves on haggard trees,

Dancing, cackling in the breeze;

Bristling black cats hawk and hiss,

This is known as Samonios’ kiss.

 

A Murder gathers for the feast,

Cawing, clawing presage beast;

Pumpkins peek with grinning glow,

Wordless wards of Samhain’s show.

 

Witches’ caldrons boil and bubble,

Voiceless vexes, toil and trouble;

Cadavers crawl from gaping graves,

These are known as Púca’s slaves.

 

Alas! I mourn the rising sun,

When nature’s hex and I undone;

Spiraling entwined to the Abyss,

Samonios bestows a final kiss…

Good night.

 

See you tomorrow with another horrible sketch, and thanks for visiting the blog!

-Dwight